Ten Creative Doers to Follow on Twitter

We are entering an age when creativity will become increasingly important. Our world is transformed by those who can turn great ideas into real, tangible products and initiatives. Applying imaginative thinking skills to create something new is no small task, but there are quite a few people who do it over and over again, tapping into their creative potential. In the second installment of the 10 Twitterers series, I have identified ten individuals who actively apply their imaginations to create something. These “creative doers” aren’t only the typically thought of visual artists. These creators range from filmmakers to fundraisers to industrial designers, illustrating that the creative capacity manifests itself in many different forms. Unifying the group is their Twitter participation, documenting and sharing their creative journeys in 140 words or less. Go ahead and read their posts, it might provide some insight into their creative process and hopefully it will inspire you to unleash your own creativity. Continue reading

Imagination First Comes Out in Paperback

In their 2009 book Imagination First: Unlocking the Power of Possibility, Imagination Now contributors Eric Liu and Scott Noppe-Brandon debunked a few myths, took imagination off its lofty pedestal, and made their premise clear: everyone has imagination! It is an essential cognitive skill that this society needs in large supplies if it is to meet the future head-on, and since it is a skill, it must be practiced.

The pragmatic approach, resulting in the description of actual imagination practices that are at the core of the book, paid off: the readers were at the very least intrigued, at best they were inspired to change their work strategies, their academic practices, even their private lives. They came from fields of interest as diverse as those of the imagination practitioners described on the book’s pages: think food retailer, teacher, marine corps officers.

Imagination First has just been reprinted in paperback edition. There was a specific purpose to this second edition: to reflect on what had been learned since the first edition, to “enhance” the book with additional texts and information, and, given its original success, to make sure that it reached the widest audience ever. Continue reading

Lincoln Center Institute’s Capacities for Imaginative Learning

Image by Nancy Bareis

A growing number of blog visitors have been seeking information about Lincoln Center Institute‘s Capacities for Imaginative Learning.

LCI has created the Capacities for Imaginative Learning as a framework for student learning, applicable to the Common Core Standards across the curriculum. The Capacities operate as both strategies for, and outcomes of, study according to LCI’s practice.

The Capacities for Imaginative Learning are:

Noticing Deeply to identify and articulate layers of detail in a work of art or other object of study through continuous interaction with it over time.

Embodying to experience a work of art or other object of study through your senses, as well as emotionally, and also to physically represent that experience.

Questioning to ask questions throughout your explorations that further your own learning; to ask the question, “What if?”

Making Connections to connect what you notice and the patterns you see to your prior knowledge and experiences, to others’ knowledge and experiences, and to text and multimedia resources.

Identifying Patterns to find relationships among the details that you notice, group them, and recognize patterns.

Exhibiting Empathy to respect the diverse perspectives of others in the community; to understand the experiences of others emotionally, as well as intellectually.

Living with Ambiguity to understand that issues have more than one interpretation, that not all problems have immediate or clear-cut solutions, and to be patient while a resolution becomes clear.

Creating Meaning to create your own interpretations based on the previous capacities, see these in the light of others in the community, create a synthesis, and express it in your own voice.

Taking Action to try out new ideas, behaviors or situations in ways that are neither too easy nor too dangerous or difficult, based on the synthesis of what you have learned in your explorations.

Reflecting/Assessing to look back on your learning, continually assess what you have learned, assess/identify what challenges remain, and assess/identify what further learning needs to happen. This occurs not only at the end of a learning experience, but is part of what happens throughout that experience. It is also not the end of your learning; it is part of beginning to learn something else.

Click here to download a copy of LCI’s Capacities for Imaginative Learning (pdf)

Ten Imaginative Thinkers to Follow on Twitter

“What is the root of creativity and how can we unlock the power of imaginative thinking?” Here at Lincoln Center Institute we think about this question quite often. We turn to books and Web resources to gain insight into the subject, with authors discussing the latest theories in cognition, creative problem solving, and intrinsic motivation. After compiling a list of some of our favorite authors I noticed that quite a few of them are actually talking about this subject on a daily basis. So I have put together a list of these authors who are exploring the concept of imaginative thinking in their work—and in their lives—and posting about it on Twitter.

Twitter is a valuable tool that should not be overlooked! This social network creates communities through shared interests, and can help you connect with people and exchange ideas instantaneously. So take a glimpse at some of these imaginative thinkers and see what they are up to, what is inspiring them, and what they have to say at this very moment. I have also included a recommended book by each author, in case you wish to explore their theories in more detail. Continue reading

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